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FAQ

The sections below answer questions about:

  • course sequence and prerequisites/corequisites
  • what is expected of students
  • parental involvement
  • class size
  • assessment
  • grade reporting
  • high school credit
  • textbooks
  • private tutoring
  • learning disabilities
  • summer study
  • college credit
  • the ultimate goals for all Scriptorium courses
WHAT ORDER SHOULD THE COURSES BE TAKEN IN?

Introduction to Composition is required as a pre-requisite or co-requisite for all high school-level courses. Parents are responsible for determining whether their student is ready for a particular course.

  • Courses open to 6th grade through 8th grade: Introduction to Composition, Middle School History and Literature, Fine Arts
  • Courses open to 9th grade and up: All courses except Middle School History and Literature
WHAT IS EXPECTED OF STUDENTS, and WHAT IS HOMEWORK LIKE?

Writing. Students in high school humane letters courses and electives are expected to be able to write essays and Works Cited pages with minimal assistance. Typically in these courses, two essays of 3-5 pages each are assigned per semester. Most courses also have midterm and final exams in each semester. Most exams are oral or written.

Reading and Discussion. All courses are reading and writing intensive. Depending on ability and course materials, students should plan to spend roughly 1 hour per day per credit on homework. The difficulty of the material will vary throughout the year depending on the type of text and the era it was written in. Students must come to class prepared to discuss their readings each week.

Scheduling Work. Students must keep track of their assignments and contact the tutor with any questions they have about assignments. They must schedule their work and should develop the habit of checking email daily to ensure that they receive assignments and feedback on essays.

Presenting and Defending Their Ideas. Students will be defending their ideas in class throughout the semester. However, on Defense Day at the end of each semester, students give presentations on one of their essays and respond to questions about their work.

Turning Work in On Time. All work must be turned in on time in the correct format. Late work is heavily penalized.

Appropriate Classroom Behavior. Students and the tutor work together to create an atmosphere of educational camraderie and friendly but avid debate. While Scriptorium does not require a uniform, modest attire suitable to the dignity of our studies is required of male and female students.

HOW ARE PARENTS INVOLVED?

As homeschool parents, parents are ultimately responsible for their student’s education.

HOW MANY STUDENTS WILL BE IN A CLASS?

Classes have a minimum of three students and a maximum of twelve students, though exceptions may be made.

HOW ARE STUDENTS ASSESSED?

The tutor recognizes that traditional letter grades must be offered for transcripts. However, perfect grades are never to be seen as the goal of the course: the goal is student understanding of the subject and hopefully a lasting interest in or appreciation of it. Grades are used as a form of accountability to ensure that students complete assignments and to encourage students to do their best work within their circumstances (other schoolwork, family responsibilities, and work and church commitments). The tutor believes that grades should not be inflated: students who do not do work at the highest level should not receive the highest grades. However, the tutor also understands that there are multiple reasons why students work at different levels; students may lack ability, time, or interest to do work at the highest level. Ultimately, homeschool parents report grades.

Following the descriptions from Classical Academic Press, Scriptorium uses the following four grades:

  • Magna cum laude (“with great praise” => A): Excellence; the student’s work demonstrates hard work and depth of thought; all directions have been followed; there are very few and minor errors, or no errors. It is important to remember that only a few students desire to work at a very high level of thought and writing; this means that only a few students will receive the highest grades.
  • Cum laude (“with praise” => B): Very good work; ideally, a typical student working diligently and following directions carefully should be able to receive very good grades.
  • Satis (“satisfactory” => C): Satisfactory work; applies to student work that has been done at a level only sufficient to pass their assignments.
  • Non satis (“not sufficient” => D/F): The work does not demonstrate even average effort; or the student has failed to turn in his work on time (or at all).
WHEN WILL SEMESTER GRADES BE REPORTED?

Grades will be reported at the close of each semester, typically within 2-3 weeks of the last class, provided that tuition for the semester has been paid in full. Late work is heavily penalized. Work turned in after the last class period of the semester will not be graded.

WHAT TEXTBOOKS DO I PURCHASE?

Required texts are listed on the webpage for each course. Unless noted otherwise, hard copies of these texts must be purchased – using the correct ISBN number – for use in and out of class meetings. These books may be purchased used for greater savings. All required texts will be used for writing essays. Siblings taking the same class are welcome to share textbooks.

IS PRIVATE TUTORING OFFERED?

Courses offered during any given school year are also available via private tutoring. The number of spaces is extremely limited. Please see the Private Tutoring page for more information.

WHAT ABOUT STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES?

Students of a variety of abilities are welcome! Parents with students who have reading or writing disabilities should speak with the tutor before the start of the course. Please note that the tutor is not qualified as a learning or behavioral therapist.

ARE THERE OPTIONS FOR SUMMER STUDY?

Private tutoring is available upon request for an additional fee. Students may undertake the Honors Program in the summer. Also, some courses may be offered in the summer. Students and the tutor will meet for a 3-4-hour class once a week for 8 weeks to provide for the standard 30 hours of instruction. No summer classes meet on either Memorial Day or Independence Day and all summer classes will end before August.

DOES SCRIPTORIUM OFFER ACT PREP WORKSHOPS?

The tutor offers ACT workshops – test only or test and writing portion – upon request. Interested parents should contact the tutor for cost and a sample workshop schedule.

CAN STUDENTS EARN COLLEGE CREDIT?

Students in the courses listed may earn college credit after their Scriptorium course by taking a CLEP exam. Students wishing to take a CLEP exam in these subjects may schedule a review session with the tutor for an additional fee. For information about colleges that accept CLEP credits, please see this document – Colleges that Accept CLEP Credit

  • U.S. History (CLEP exams available for History of the United States I and II)
  • U.S. Literature (CLEP exam available for American Literature)
  • Western Civilization (CLEP exams available for Western Civilization I and II)
  • Government and Economics (CLEP exam available for American Government)
WHAT ARE SCRIPTORIUM’S GOALS?

The ultimate purpose for Scriptorium courses is to help all students:

  • learn truth from history and literature
  • develop skill in discerning between truth and falsehood, good and evil, beauty and ugliness
  • develop skill in writing and speaking truthfully, clearly, and winsomely
  • develop their appreciation for the true, the good, and the beautiful
  • develop habits of wisdom, diligence, promptness, and courtesy in their work

Page Image (c) 2015 Grace Hughbanks: Stained glass window in the cathedral at Aachen, Germany.